Another Financial Services Giant Announced a Huge Data Breach

On July 29, Capital One announced that a hacking incident on July 19 led to the unauthorized access of 106 million individual records of its credit card applicants and customers. The company issued the following information about the breach, but advises that the investigation is still underway and that analysis is subject to change.

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  • Approximately 100 million American customers and 6 million Canadian customers were affected
  • The largest category of leaked data was garnered from credit card applications submitted between 2015 and early 2019, including names, addresses, self-reported income, birthdates, phone numbers and email addresses
  • Some credit card transactions, credit score information, and other customer status data was also leaked
  • The majority of social security numbers and bank account numbers were not leaked, except for approximately 140,000 Social Security numbers of credit card customers and about 80,000 linked bank account numbers of secured credit card customers
  • The company is notifying affected individuals “through a variety of channels”
  • Capital One promises free credit monitoring and identity protection for everyone affected

Unlike other recent data breaches, the FBI has made an arrest in connection with the Capital One incident. USA TODAY reports that the suspect is a 33-year old Seattle woman and former data engineer named Paige A. Thompson. 

The Capital One announcement comes on the tails of huge data breaches from Experian and First American. Based on the ever-increasing number of large-scale data breaches, identity theft and credit monitoring is a good idea for anyone, even those who have not been explicitly affected. Whether you plan on monitoring this activity yourself or subscribing to a professional service, use these Safety.com resources to get started: