States Most Affected by Cybercrime

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Cybercrime is a massive global industry, reaching $3.5 billion in damages from reported incidents in 2019. To uncover the states most affected by cybercrime, Safety.com consulted the 2019 FBI Internet Crime Report. The report provides statistics for every state regarding the number of victims, number of cybercriminals, total losses, and total earnings by cybercriminals. States were ranked by total monetary losses as a result of cybercrime.

To supplement that information, Safety.com has included details about internet access in each state and state computer crime laws. Social engineering is one of the leading forms of information theft that causes financial damages, and the perpetrators only have to call and pretend to be from a tech support team. People are vulnerable to these social attacks the same way they’re liable to fall for phishing or redirection attacks.

The laws vary a great deal on a state-by-state basis, so if you believe you’ve been a victim of cybercrime, check with an attorney in your local area—this list should not be considered legal advice; and the statistics and descriptions of laws here are meant only to inform. Because of the nature of the internet and its involvement in these crimes, the FBI also offers services for any cybercrime that crosses state lines.

Who’s most vulnerable to cybercrime? This is a harder question to answer beyond very broad generalities. One major factor of cybercrime is that people create flimsy passwords because they fear they won’t remember something more secure. Now, software such as password managers can help people close the loop on creating more secure passwords they don’t need to write down on a note pad next to their computer. The brief discomfort of figuring out a new technology is nothing compared to the discomfort and hassle of losing access to accounts, having to cancel everything, or filing a report with the authorities.

#51. Vermont

#51. Vermont

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– Total losses: $2,329,973
– Losses per victim: $4,660 (500 total victims; #49 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $686,424 (#51 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 131 (#51 in the country)

Sen. Bernie Sanders represents a very relaxed and rural state with the lowest overall amount of cybercrime in the United States. That’s in line with Vermont’s overall low crime rate. Size plays a part in frequency of cybercrime, since it can be initiated from and target places almost anywhere in the world.

#50. South Dakota

#50. South Dakota

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– Total losses: $3,086,846
– Losses per victim: $6,526 (473 total victims; #51 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $975,629 (#50 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 133 (#50 in the country)

Relatively rural, low-population South Dakota has made the news over Mount Rushmore this year. Much of the state is covered by state or national parks, where penalties for crimes might be even more severe.

#49. Maine

#49. Maine

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– Total losses: $3,267,370
– Losses per victim: $3,713 (880 total victims; #47 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $1,656,784 (#46 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 312 (#44 in the country)

Coastal Maine has a low population that’s pretty insulated from the rest of the United States, with neutral or moderate politics and a lot of industry and commercial fishing. Incidence of cybercrime is low, but the state has strong laws about “criminal invasion of computer privacy.”

#48. North Dakota

#48. North Dakota

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– Total losses: $4,527,733
– Losses per victim: $9,259 (489 total victims; #50 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $1,452,038 (#48 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 377 (#43 in the country)

North Dakota is one of the least populous states, so even with low losses to cybercrime, the per person number is nearly $10,000. In North Dakota, computer crime and computer fraud are handled separately.

#47. West Virginia

#47. West Virginia

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– Total losses: $5,442,899
– Losses per victim: $4,436 (1,227 total victims; #42 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $2,754,324 (#40 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 262 (#46 in the country)

The West Virginia Computer Crime and Abuse Act comprehensively deals with a dozen or more kinds of cybercrime, which is still quite low. West Virginians may be savvy, because the state’s struggling industrial economy has worked to attract high tech businesses and population hubs.

#46. Delaware

#46. Delaware

– Total losses: $6,105,401
– Losses per victim: $5,749 (1,062 total victims; #44 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $2,548,620 (#42 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 948 (#29 in the country)

Delaware is one of the smallest states in size, making it a hard target to hit when there are much larger markets elsewhere—someone conducting a phishing scheme isn’t usually worried about the origin of the email addresses. But the number of cybercriminals is much higher, breaking its rank into the 20s.

#45. New Hampshire

#45. New Hampshire

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– Total losses: $7,284,552
– Losses per victim: $6,307 (1,155 total victims; #43 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $3,520,598 (#37 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 264 (#45 in the country)

Tiny New Hampshire thrives on political independence and policies such as no sales tax—its number of cybercrime laws is pretty low as a consequence. Fortunately, the state’s number of cybercriminals is fairly low anyway.

#44. Wyoming

#44. Wyoming

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– Total losses: $8,138,463
– Losses per victim: $14,797 (550 total victims; #48 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $1,547,198 (#47 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 175 (#49 in the country)

Wyoming is the least populous U.S. state, with small cities and huge stretches of arid land and mountains. People in rural communities are still some of the last to receive the latest and best internet speeds, for example. The loss per victim, at nearly $15,000, is very high for such a low population.

#43. Montana

#43. Montana

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– Total losses: $8,295,010
– Losses per victim: $8,578 (967 total victims; #46 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $3,235,197 (#38 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 832 (#35 in the country)

Montana has a huge area with a low population and the same kinds of internet access factors that might influence folks who might otherwise give cybercrime a try—it’s hard to send mass emails or hack when the connection speed isn’t fast. Montana cybercriminals must be of sound mind and intend to commit a crime in order to be convicted, with losses of more than $1,000 tipping over into felony charges.

#42. Alaska

#42. Alaska

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– Total losses: $9,654,238
– Losses per victim: $6,654 (1,451 total victims; #38 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $1,431,485 (#49 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 222 (#48 in the country)

In Alaska, there are no misdemeanor computer crimes—all are felonies. Because Alaska is gigantic and so far from the Lower 48, it’s often the last to receive new telecommunication advances, and by some metrics is last in the nation for broadband access.

 

#41. Hawaii

#41. Hawaii

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– Total losses: $10,005,566
– Losses per victim: $7,167 (1,396 total victims; #40 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $4,761,209 (#35 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 547 (#40 in the country)

It’s easy to see Hawaii as a vacation destination, but the state has a vibrant population of regular working people of all kinds, and a proportion of extremely wealthy residents will also attract con artists as always. Still, the state has relatively low cybercrime. Like Alaska, Hawaii is separated from core U.S. telecom infrastructure.

#40. Mississippi

#40. Mississippi

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– Total losses: $10,129,650
– Losses per victim: $6,124 (1,654 total victims; #36 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $2,518,412 (#43 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 748 (#38 in the country)

In addition to the common and federal laws against cybercrime, Mississippi also has laws against cyberstalking and cyberbullying. Mississippi is dotted with vibrant midsize cities, but also has many residents in very rural communities where internet access is not as fast.

#39. Rhode Island

#39. Rhode Island

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– Total losses: $10,182,363
– Losses per victim: $10,072 (1,011 total victims; #45 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $2,105,153 (#44 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 241 (#47 in the country)

Geographically the smallest U.S. state, Rhode Island has just five counties, but quite a high population relative to that, and the state is part of the densely populated New England corridor that has some of the fastest internet speeds in the nation. Cyberstalking and theft of under $500 are misdemeanors in the state’s laws.

#38. Washington DC

#38. Washington DC

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– Total losses: $12,175,460
– Losses per victim: $8,653 (1,407 total victims; #39 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $8,280,731 (#28 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 779 (#37 in the country)

Densely populated Washington D.C. has some of the most influential people in the nation, but also a high rate of poverty. Most of the wealthiest people either live in the district part time for political careers or have primary homes that are either in Maryland or Virginia. That said, the cybercriminals who do offend in D.C. make upward of $8 million each.

#37. Idaho

#37. Idaho

– Total losses: $12,627,102
– Losses per victim: $8,503 (1,485 total victims; #37 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $5,892,792 (#32 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 432 (#42 in the country)

Idaho is home to some of the most advanced technology in the world at facilities like Idaho National Laboratory and wealthy getaways like Sun Valley, but the rest of the state still has quite a low incidence of cybercrime. With a mostly rural population and a low median household income, Idaho is lucky to be a little off the radar for cybercrime.

#36. Nebraska

#36. Nebraska

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– Total losses: $14,596,769
– Losses per victim: $10,812 (1,350 total victims; #41 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $2,614,627 (#41 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 1,201 (#24 in the country)

In the heart of the breadbasket, Nebraska has a surprisingly high number of cybercriminals. Despite one of the lowest access rates to broadband internet, people are managing to see nearly $15 million in cybercrime loss damages per year. In Nebraska state law, attempts to commit computer crime or losses of less than $1,000 are just progressive misdemeanors.

#35. Kansas

#35. Kansas

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– Total losses: $16,107,619
– Losses per victim: $8,176 (1,970 total victims; #35 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $8,954,238 (#26 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 976 (#28 in the country)

Nebraska and Kansas arrive back-to-back by total losses to cybercrime, and Kansas has far better access to broadband internet, which might give the state an edge over its neighbor. Kansas law requires intent, meaning an accidentally shared password isn’t a crime. Writing down passwords is a serious and common error—many cybercrimes are “social engineering,” which is when someone imitates a tech support worker or similar and simply asks for or looks for your information.

#34. Kentucky

#34. Kentucky

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– Total losses: $17,014,895
– Losses per victim: $5,519 (3,083 total victims; #31 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $4,704,251 (#36 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 789 (#36 in the country)

In Kentucky, there are robust cybercrime laws including a less common one covering attempted cybercrime. The tiered law covers different levels of severity with both misdemeanor and felony standards.

#33. New Mexico

#33. New Mexico

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– Total losses: $17,983,833
– Losses per victim: $8,829 (2,037 total victims; #33 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $1,889,690 (#45 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 943 (#30 in the country)

New Mexico has low broadband access as well as low median household income, making it a surprisingly high #33 on this list. In New Mexico law, felony charges also start at the lower range at just $250 in damages.

#32. South Carolina

#32. South Carolina

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– Total losses: $20,186,041
– Losses per victim: $4,445 (4,541 total victims; #25 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $8,454,695 (#27 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 1,137 (#25 in the country)

South Carolina has losses of more than $20 million, but a per person loss of less than $5,000, meaning the number of victims is proportionally high. The state’s laws don’t allow prosecution of attempted cybercrime nor civil lawsuits for damages.

#31. Alabama

#31. Alabama

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– Total losses: $20,586,392
– Losses per victim: $5,011 (4,108 total victims; #28 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $7,988,933 (#29 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 1,049 (#27 in the country)

Alabama has disproportionately high cybercrime damages based on its median household income and poverty rate—the state is firmly in the middle quartile for losses per victim, cybercriminal earnings, and total number of cybercriminals. Alabama’s original cybercrime law dated back to 1985 and was fully updated and replaced in 2012.

#30. Wisconsin

#30. Wisconsin

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– Total losses: $21,576,109
– Losses per victim: $3,383 (6,378 total victims; #20 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $10,722,858 (#24 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 933 (#33 in the country)

Wisconsin has one of the largest and oldest internet presences in the United States because of its massive complex of state universities, which enroll 180,000 students on 26 campuses. That’s in addition to more than 20 private colleges. With moderate median household income and good internet access, this is a cybercriminal’s comfort zone—but the per-victim damages are low at just over $3,300.

#29. Arkansas

#29. Arkansas

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– Total losses: $22,681,002
– Losses per victim: $11,392 (1,991 total victims; #34 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $3,206,417 (#39 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 532 (#41 in the country)

Arkansas has a low median household income, but relatively high—over $11,000 damages per victim—which accounts for its middle position on the list. The state’s law doesn’t charge a felony until damages are greater than $2,500, but people can sue for damages in civil court.

#28. Indiana

#28. Indiana

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– Total losses: $24,030,998
– Losses per victim: $2,466 (9,746 total victims; #10 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $231,002,496 (#1 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 1,933 (#18 in the country)

Indiana has one of the lowest per victim damages at under $2,500, but a staggering more than $230 million earned by cybercriminals. The legal code ranges from low-level misdemeanors to felony cyberterrorism that causes great harm.

#27. Louisiana

#27. Louisiana

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– Total losses: $24,214,439
– Losses per victim: $6,366 (3,804 total victims; #29 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $4,958,777 (#34 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 1,103 (#26 in the country)

Louisiana has low median household income, but a medium amount of cybercrime. Although victims can’t sue in civil court, the cybercrime law switches from misdemeanor to felony at just $500 worth of damages.

#26. Missouri

#26. Missouri

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– Total losses: $27,290,803
– Losses per victim: $5,369 (5,083 total victims; #23 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $6,432,347 (#31 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 1,376 (#21 in the country)

In Missouri, victims lost more than $27 million in cybercrime damages in 2019. Its place on the list is higher than its median household income suggests, and victims in Missouri are covered by cybercrime laws as well as the ability to sue in civil court.

#25. Iowa

#25. Iowa

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– Total losses: $27,919,567
– Losses per victim: $5,481 (5,094 total victims; #22 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $5,763,972 (#33 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 612 (#39 in the country)

Iowa is in the center of the list for everything but the number of cybercriminals, which is disproportionately low. Under Iowa law, damages up to $1,000 are still misdemeanors, but Iowans can also sue in civil court.

#24. Oklahoma

#24. Oklahoma

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– Total losses: $28,556,326
– Losses per victim: $9,891 (2,887 total victims; #32 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $12,082,341 (#22 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 940 (#31 in the country)

Oklahoma has robust cybercrime laws, including prosecution for attempted cybercrime. Oklahoma has a lower median household income than its rank here, and nearly $10,000 per cybercrime victim is a big financial hit.

#23. Tennessee

#23. Tennessee

– Total losses: $33,052,233
– Losses per victim: $5,917 (5,586 total victims; #21 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $15,532,247 (#17 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 2,186 (#15 in the country)

Tennessee’s cybercriminals are trying to earn their way out of the state’s relatively low median household income, dinging thousands of victims for nearly $6,000 each. Tennessee’s Personal and Commercial Computer Act of 2003 covers a range of crimes and intents, including terrorism.

#22. Connecticut

#22. Connecticut

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– Total losses: $33,789,138
– Losses per victim: $7,658 (4,412 total victims; #26 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $17,845,526 (#15 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 846 (#34 in the country)

Connecticut is one of the wealthiest U.S. states and has high-crime Hartford, but the combination has not led to a proportional amount of cybercrime. Damages above $1,000 become felonies, while the same crimes with less damages are misdemeanors.

#21. Nevada

#21. Nevada

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– Total losses: $35,720,611
– Losses per victim: $5,598 (6,381 total victims; #19 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $13,497,823 (#20 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 2,481 (#13 in the country)

Nevada leads the nation in areas like gambling and entertainment, in a non-coronavirus season, and you might guess the dynamic is ripe for cybercrime. Instead, Nevada’s rates are in the middle, just a little higher than its lower broadband access and lower resident income indicate.

#20. Oregon

#20. Oregon

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– Total losses: $37,088,022
– Losses per victim: $7,706 (4,813 total victims; #24 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $9,325,763 (#25 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 1,240 (#23 in the country)

Oregon has a robust set of cybercrime laws, including misdemeanor charges for any amount of damages and prosecution for attempted cybercrime. Even so, the losses per victim of more than $7,500 indicate that Oregon’s cybercriminals aren’t fooling around.

#19. Minnesota

#19. Minnesota

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– Total losses: $39,421,520
– Losses per victim: $8,984 (4,388 total victims; #27 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $11,518,980 (#23 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 1,276 (#22 in the country)

Minnesota’s place on the list is in line with its high-medium median household income and broadband access, with the prosperous Twin Cities metro area and technology companies like 3M. The penalties for and definition of misdemeanor cybercrime mean that only repeat offenders or life endangerment end up charged with felonies.

#18. Utah

#18. Utah

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– Total losses: $46,458,273
– Losses per victim: $14,061 (3,304 total victims; #30 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $7,912,016 (#30 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 934 (#32 in the country)

Utah law begins at any dollar amount worth of damages, and attempted cybercrime is also prosecutable. All of this is detailed in Utah’s dedicated Computer Crime Act.

#17. Arizona

#17. Arizona

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– Total losses: $47,058,842
– Losses per victim: $6,037 (7,795 total victims; #17 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $25,960,706 (#11 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 2,119 (#16 in the country)

Arizona is toward the top of the list, but has median household income firmly in the middle. The state’s cybercriminals brought in a staggering almost $26 million, but the per victim amount was less eye watering at just $6,000—a lot of money, but just #17 on the list.

#16. Michigan

#16. Michigan

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– Total losses: $47,122,182
– Losses per victim: $5,712 (8,249 total victims; #15 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $13,466,196 (#21 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 2,029 (#17 in the country)

Michigan’s median household income is low-middle among U.S. states, and its amount of cybercrime losses is disproportionately high. Michigan’s cybercrime laws are very minimal, but prosecution begins at any amount of financial damages.

#15. North Carolina

#15. North Carolina

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– Total losses: $48,425,764
– Losses per victim: $5,889 (8,223 total victims; #16 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $13,983,462 (#19 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 2,259 (#14 in the country)

With a combination of many midsize cities and a robust public university system, North Carolina is an interesting place for a fairly high amount of cybercrime. Nearly $49 million in damages are spread out to more than 8,000 victims, but all are protected by North Carolina’s robust cybercrime laws.

#14. Maryland

#14. Maryland

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– Total losses: $52,830,779
– Losses per victim: $4,512 (11,709 total victims; #6 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $23,977,444 (#13 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 7,228 (#5 in the country)

Maryland has one of the very highest numbers of victims in the country, perhaps related to having one of the very highest median household incomes. But the large number of victims does mean the average damages fall to just over $4,500, against the state’s median $82,000 income.

#13. Colorado

#13. Colorado

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– Total losses: $65,118,524
– Losses per victim: $6,721 (9,689 total victims; #11 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $16,678,494 (#16 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 1,848 (#19 in the country)

People in Colorado lost just over $65 million in 2019, shared among more than 9,600 victims. The state has a handful of large-midsize cities with a high number of technology company headquarters, making it a likely target for hackers and other cybercriminals.

#12. Washington

#12. Washington

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– Total losses: $71,286,037
– Losses per victim: $5,444 (13,095 total victims; #5 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $31,928,985 (#9 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 3,317 (#9 in the country)

Washington state is packed with some of the most valuable companies in the world, along with their highly paid technology workforces. That means tons of high-end hardware and cutting-edge technology kept under fallible lock and key and surrounded by very technically talented people.

#11. Georgia

#11. Georgia

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– Total losses: $79,732,460
– Losses per victim: $8,787 (9,074 total victims; #13 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $55,338,192 (#6 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 3,325 (#8 in the country)

Georgia is home to juggernauts like the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Delta Airlines, and Home Depot, drawing cybercrime out of proportion to the state’s low-average median income. In Georgia law, many computer crimes can be either misdemeanors or felonies based on consequences handed down by the judge.

#10. Massachusetts

#10. Massachusetts

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– Total losses: $84,173,754
– Losses per victim: $12,966 (6,492 total victims; #18 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $20,192,012 (#14 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 1,480 (#20 in the country)

Massachusetts residents lost an appalling $84 million to cybercrime in 2019. The state has some of the best internet coverage in the nation and one of the highest median household incomes.

#9. Virginia

#9. Virginia

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– Total losses: $92,467,791
– Losses per victim: $7,921 (11,674 total victims; #7 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $24,879,452 (#12 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 4,829 (#6 in the country)

Virginia is a hub for industry as well as government and contractors because of its location right outside Washington D.C., making its high amount of cybercrime both logically consistent and scary. The state laws specifically address federal rather than state reporting, probably because of a high number of cases that involve nearby D.C.

#8. Pennsylvania

#8. Pennsylvania

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– Total losses: $94,281,611
– Losses per victim: $8,639 (10,914 total victims; #8 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $29,787,276 (#10 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 2,793 (#11 in the country)

Pennsylvania is a little surprising, with a very high amount of money lost to cybercrime in 2019 compared with an average median household income. The state does have some major corporate headquarters as well as huge, world-class universities, creating a combination of concentrated “target” information and high-speed technology.

#7. New Jersey

#7. New Jersey

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– Total losses: $106,474,464
– Losses per victim: $11,743 (9,067 total victims; #14 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $32,048,215 (#8 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 3,312 (#10 in the country)

New Jersey has a detailed criminal code for computer crimes, with specific activities laid out and subsequently classified as misdemeanors or felonies by a judge. The state has one of the highest median incomes and is just a stone’s throw from New York, so there are major headquarters and a lot of wealth to be found.

#6. Illinois

#6. Illinois

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– Total losses: $107,152,415
– Losses per victim: $10,366 (10,337 total victims; #9 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $48,100,395 (#7 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 3,465 (#7 in the country)

Illinois’ median household income wouldn’t place it this high on the list, but the state is home to major companies in Chicagoland as well as classic industrial businesses downstate. And because of its central location and number of huge state universities, Illinois also has world-class broadband access.

#5. New York

#5. New York

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– Total losses: $198,765,769
– Losses per victim: $9,301 (21,371 total victims; #4 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $95,996,214 (#4 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 8,345 (#4 in the country)

It’s surprising that New York is “just” #5 on the list based on its enormous cultural influence, population, and business presence within the United States. More than 21,000 victims lost a combined nearly $199 million in 2019 alone.

#4. Texas

#4. Texas

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– Total losses: $221,535,479
– Losses per victim: $8,151 (27,178 total victims; #3 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $126,282,907 (#3 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 10,093 (#3 in the country)

Texas has a middle-median household income, but it’s gigantic and has a huge population scattered in at least five cities with 1 million-plus residents. That makes a total loss of $221 million feel almost modest.

#3. Ohio

#3. Ohio

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– Total losses: $264,663,456
– Losses per victim: $28,394 (9,321 total victims; #12 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $14,569,674 (#18 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 2,506 (#12 in the country)

Ohio is a bit of a stumper to take the bronze medal in cybercrime because the state has a low-average median household income and particularly average internet access statistics. But the damages per victim work out to an astonishing $28,000, by far the highest on the entire list.

#2. Florida

#2. Florida

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– Total losses: $293,445,963
– Losses per victim: $10,797 (27,178 total victims; #2 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $95,910,080 (#5 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 11,047 (#2 in the country)

Florida has a high population and an especially high proportion of senior citizens, which could help to explain the high incidence of cybercrime. Florida’s computer crime laws are in depth, detailing specific factors that determine if a crime is a misdemeanor or a felony.

#1. California

#1. California

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– Total losses: $573,624,151
– Losses per victim: $11,442 (50,132 total victims; #1 in the country)
– Total earnings by cybercriminals: $183,168,069 (#2 in the country)
– Total cybercriminals: 17,517 (#1 in the country)

Topping the list of U.S. states by total cybercrime losses is California, whose enormous population alone likely accounts for this high position. The losses per victim are pretty average among all the states in this list, but California’s more than 50,000 victims would be nearly 10% of the population of Wyoming or Alaska.


caroline delbert
Caroline Delbert

Caroline Delbert is a writer, book editor and researcher with publications in various sites such as Popular Mechanics and Scientific American.