Top 25 Safety Articles of the Week: March 15

by Erin Raub | Last Updated Mar. 15th, 2013

The Secret Life of the American Teenager

The Secret Life of the American Teenager: Yes, teens need limits and rule

This week, my favorite bloggers published some very interesting and thought-provoking content that I am eager to share with you. And while all these posts resonated with me on some level, one really stood out: a piece about how teens, even the most fiery and independent, still need limits.

Parenting is never easy, but I imagine that parenting a teenager is one of the toughest challenges. They’re growing up. And, in fact, few generations ago, many of them would already be married and parenting their own kids. But today is different. In some ways, kids have fewer responsibilities and in other ways, they have many more. They have to be responsible for their real-world and digital footprints. They have to learn how to say no to an ever-growing list of dangerous temptations. And it’s our job, as parents, to help guide and advise them. And that means setting limits and enforcing rules.

I will say, though, that I’m a little scared. My toddler is already as fiery and fiercely independent as any teenager. The 2020s are going to be rough on me.

Home Safety

  1. Mike, from the NFPA’s Safety Source, reminds us that we should have changed smoke detector batteries when we moved our clocks forward. He also links to a free resource (PDF) on smoke alarm safety at home.
  2. Judi, also of Safety Source, has some sound advice on cooking safety: never leave your stovetop unattended. This is an all-too-common (but preventable) cause of house fires.

Family & Child Safety

  1. We all know that it’s harder to be nasty to another person’s face, but Tim of uKnowKids puts this in context: cyberbullying is faceless, and is therefore easier and more prevalent than traditional schoolyard bullying.
  2. Speaking of bullying, here’s a feel-good post for you: Irene from KidPower tells us how swimming can prevent bullying. She also requests donations (as little as $1) for a micro-campaign to help a local school.
  3. Cyberbullies aren’t the only online predator: children’s own self-esteem can work against them. Leonie, The Cyber Safety Lady, shows us how to block self-harm websites.
  4. Free Range Kids posted a very thought-provoking reader comment: do parents today protect kids more because we love them more? Lenore posts a great reader response, plus some commentary of her own; the comments section is also a good read. What do you think?
  5. Baby Product Expert Jacque gives some great advice this week on what to eat when you’re expecting – and at the hospital, and while breastfeeding, and throughout your baby’s first year (whether you’re nursing or not – your baby needs a healthy mom!)
  6. The Parent Report has some excellent advice – I just want to shout, yes! – on why even the most independent, spirited teens still need boundaries, rules and limits.
  7. The Kids with Food Allergies blog posted an awesome resource for families: a video and guide to dining out with food allergies.

Mobile & Cyber Safety

  1. Hannah guest posts on Blog4Safety about 15 common Internet scams and how to avoid them. Forward this one to friends, folks! You never know who could fall prey to an online scam.
  2. Brian Krebs, of Krebs on Security, introduces us to a very useful, built-in browser tool that can help keep online threats at bay. It’s called “Click-to-Play” and it’s easy to use.
  3. And speaking of, WeLiveSecurity summarizes some Krebs on Security info about a malware-dissemination scheme targeted at Google Play.
  4. Teen sexting is problematic on many levels, but here’s one you don’t always consider: there are legal ramifications. Sexting can be considered child pornography. Please talk to your kids. Don’t just ban them from sexting; explain the why.
  5. Last week, the FTC cracked down on 20+ spam text messengers who send sneaky scams marauding as offers for freebies.
  6. I really appreciate Callie’s, of uKnowKids, alternative take on digital parenting and online security – how to protect your minor’s credit rating & Social Security Number.
  7. Chris Duff takes us through six common computer mistakes and how they can affect your security and computer performance.
  8. Robert Siciliano of McAfee reviews several mobile device security concerns – and provides some great, simple ways to boost your protection.
  9. Graham Cluley from Sophos clues us in to the public figure & celebrity identity hack that went down this week.
  10. An excellent question: Daniel of iKeepSafe asks, “Should hate websites be included in online safety and digital citizenship conversations?” What do you think, readers?

Senior Safety

  1. Susan of Help! Aging Parents tells her story – and explains some important differences in palliative care and hospice help.
  2. In this same vein, the Aging Wisely Blog discusses senior living and care – do you know the level of care at a retirement community? – and how to help your loved ones choose the best option for them.

Work Safety

  1. Eric at the Belden blog offers up some essential security concepts and advice for CEOs. Today, everyone has to be on top of cyber safety at work.
  2. You’ve heard of the Harlem Shake (please tell me you’ve heard of the Harlem Shake? If not, get thee to YouTube!), but did you know it could get you fired?
  3. Sad but true: Ruth of Moms Rising recounts the story of a man who was too afraid of losing money (or his job) to take sick days, and later died of cancer. Ruth encourages all Americans to contact their Congressmen and Congresswomen to support the Healthy Families Act, which is being reintroduced to Congress next week.
  4. If you don’t think bullying happens to adults, think again. Kevin of the Safety at Work Blog discusses peer pressure at work, and how it can beget unsafe situations.
 
 
   
 
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